Tuesday, August 26, 2014

If you roll your window up I'll shoot you

Mother of cop whitewashed his files

Broken Windows campaign to control jaw walking, ie jogging?

I Can't breath


Cop beat woman punching her repeatedly in head

Police play head games with mentally challenged woman

Cops caught in gun planting scheme

When race clouds an officer's mind

Police kill 80 yr old hard of hearing man in his own bed

In the early morning hours of June 27, 2013, a team of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies pulled up to the home of Eugene Mallory, an 80-year-old retired engineer living in the rural outskirts of Los Angeles county with his wife Tonya Pate and stepson Adrian Lamos. The deputies crashed through the front gate and began executing a search warrant for methamphetamine on the property. Detective Patrick Hobbs, a self-described narcotics expert who claimed he "smelled the strong odor of chemicals" downwind from the house after being tipped off to illegal activity from an anonymous informant, spearheaded the investigation. The deputies announced their presence, and Pate emerged from the trailer where she'd been sleeping to escape the sweltering summer heat of the California desert. Lamos and a couple of friends emerged from another trailer, and a handyman tinkering with a car on the property also gave himself up without resistance. But Mallory, who preferred to sleep in the house, was nowhere to be seen. Deputies approached the house, and what happened next is where things get murky. The deputies said they announced their presence upon entering and were met in the hallway by the 80-year-old man, wielding a gun and stumbling towards them. The deputies later changed the story when the massive bloodstains on Mallory's mattress indicated to investigators that he'd most likely been in bed at the time of the shooting. Investigators also found that an audio recording of the incident revealed a discrepancy in the deputies' original narrative: Before listening to the audio recording, [Sgt. John] Bones believed that he told Mallory to "Drop the gun" prior to the shooting. The recording revealed, however, that his commands to "Drop the gun" occurred immediately after the shooting. When it was all over, Eugene Mallory died of six gunshot wounds from Sgt. John Bones' MP-5 9mm submachine gun. When a coroner arrived, he found the loaded .22 caliber pistol the two deputies claimed Mallory had pointed at them on the bedside table. Mallory had not fired of a single shot. The raid turned up no evidence of methamphetamine on the property. To find out more about this case, including details about what the police did find, watch the above video, featuring Mallory's widow Tonya Pate. Pate has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, an agency plagued by prison abuse scandals, questionable hiring practices, and allegations of racial profiling and harassment in recent years. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department declined multiple requests to comment on this story. Approximately 7:30. Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Camera by Tracy Oppenheimer and Zach Weissmueller. Additional voice acting by Paul Detrick, Alex Manning, and Oppenheimer.

Kenneth Harding executed by SF Police over fare

On July 16, 2011, San Francisco police fatally shoot a 19 year old black male teenager Kenneth Harding. Police allegedly chased this teen over a two dollar bus fee. San Francisco police claimed he had a weapon. Witnesses claimed this murdered teen did not have any weapons and police over reacted. This victim later died at a local hospital after succumbing from life threatening injuries. Also, it is alleged this victim bled for thirty minutes, before he was taken to a hospital. The San Francisco police department claimed that Kenneth Harding actually shot himself with a .380 caliber handgun and died from this fatal shot. Officers Richard Hastings and Matthew Lopez recieved medals of valor for their handling of this incident. Witnesses claim Mr. Harding did not have a gun and a gun that police alleged to have been found later, was actually a cell phone.


It's really difficult to write about the killing of Michael Brown in Fergusen.